5 Ways to Instill A Call to Ownership in Your Church Facility

It really is great when people take ownership of your church, they take initiative and responsibility. They take notice and treat things better. After all isn’t that why we say, “treat it like your own” if you are using or borrowing something?

 

Who owns the church building? Maybe the better question is who paid for the church building?  A pastor that I used to work for always loved to hear people refer to the church as “my church”.  So rather than say “at Community church this is going on”, He liked to hear people say’ “at my church this is going on” For him it was affirming that people had taken ownership, it showed that a person closely identified with the church.

It really is great when people take ownership, they treat things better. After all isn’t that why we say, “treat it like your own” if you are using or borrowing something?

Ownership is great, but how can you foster it?

1.) Reminder Notes

In a classy way give people a call to action.

For example, you could put a nice looking table top in the bathroom that says, “As we all are the church, please help in keeping it clean.  After you have wiped your hands please use that same paper towel to wipe down the counter.”

You could put similar cards in the kitchen and coffee areas.  The key is to keep it a positive call to action.  Avoid the shaming, nagging signs like “your mother doesn’t work here, clean up after yourself”.

2.) Example

When I was in college I had a cool opportunity to be in a group that met with a billionaire in our town.

We were walking downtown taking a tour of some of his properties.  As we were walking, without missing a second of conversation, the billionaire bent down a picked up an empty cup sitting on the side walk.  He then carried that cup to the next stop at one of his properties and threw it in the trash.

The rest of that day –  all of us college students were picking up anything that was on the ground that even resembled trash.

He, the Billionaire – on many levels – set an example.

a) He was humble, not above the task of picking up garbage.

b) He showed he cared about what the city looked like.

c) He took ownership of keeping HIS city clean by picking up the cup and carrying it until he found a proper means of disposal..

People follow leaders.  What kind of example are you as a leader setting for your congregation?

3.) Proclamation

I am not a big fan of making a lot of announcements during a service, but occasionally it is good to give people a reminder of what, as a church, you think is important.

Again make sure you keep it positive and simple.

For example, “One of our core values is excellence unto the Lord, you can help us accomplish excellence in the presentation of our facility by making sure you pick up the cups and papers around you and dispose of them in the containers in the lobby. Doing this ensures that the next service can walk into a clean sanctuary just as you did this morning.”

4.) Stewardship

What we value we generally make happen.  If you value stewardship it would be good to remind people in your annual report about how we as a church must be a good steward of the facility that we have be given the privilege of caring for.  Following the reminder, it would be a great time to ask people to volunteer to clean the parking lot, care for the landscaping, paint or do anything that needs to be done to help beautify the facility.

5.) Call to action

Most pastors are good at putting a call to action at the end of their sermon. It would be wise to also occasionally include a call to ownership.

It might be a call for people to represent their church in a positive manner by living a God honoring life.  It might be a call to take ownership of the homeless problem in your city.  It could be a specific call like caring for the facility that we as the church are all responsible for.

Once people take ownership, they take responsibility.  Go and remind people who the church is and who the owners are.

What Does Your Church Facility Have To Do With Attendance?

The simple answer is nothing and everything.

I am sure you have seen massive churches that have very low attendance, relative to their size.  I am also sure you have seen a small church bursting at the seams with people.  As with most things in life, shall we say, the answer is also complicated.

Holy Spirit-filled ministry in any building brings growth, but I also believe that great Spirit-filled ministry results in great things that permeate throughout the entire ministry, including the facility.

So what can you do with your facility to help encourage attendance?

1.)  People come to church for an experience.

This experience is both spiritual and social.

I worked with a church who had an amazing piece of local artwork that you encountered as you walked in the front door.  It was a beautiful representation of Christ made with tiny pieces of colored glass.

It was such a thing of beauty that it caused you to pause and take it in.  It also became a great discussion starter for anyone new to the church. As they would see the art piece and stop to gaze at, a well-positioned greeter would chime in at the right time say how beautiful it was and how it was done by a local artist.

For those that attend or visit this church they have an experience that immediately points them to Christ and at the same time offers an opportunity for social engagement.  What in your facility brings a social or spiritual experience?

2.) People come to connect and fellowship.

One of my favorite things to do before a worship service starts is to hang out in the lobby and just observe what happens out there.  It’s great to watch old friends connect, to see people hug those who are hurting and to watch the joy the expressed and people connect.  ‘

Do you have a place that allows this connection to happen?  Do you encourage it by placing appropriate furniture and fixtures around to serve as anchors for people to connect?

3.) People come to find meaning.

One of the reason people come to church is to make sense out of this crazy life.  As mentioned above artwork can be a great way to for people to see things in a different way.  Sometimes art can be that catalyst that helps one find meaning.

Something as simple as having a place for people to bring goods and items to drop off to go help the needy is another way for people to connect and find meaning.

4.) People come to seek respite from a noisy world.

Today we are all bombarded with so many messages, many of them conflict with our Christian walk.  People who come on Sunday are wanting to take a deep breath, refocus and if only for a brief period of time get some separation from the noise.

In your facility are there areas where one can “escape” and get alone with God?  Do you have separate prayer areas? Seating areas that are in some out of the way places? Ultimately it is the individual’s responsibility to detach from the noise.  However, some simple things in your facility can help facilitate in that endeavor.

I really like it when there is a separate “quiet room” This could be a classroom that is converted into a prayer room.  Use soft lighting and comfortable furniture and a door that closes to create a living room type of atmosphere and separation.

5.) People come to seek comfort

One of the great comforts we have as Christians is having others pray for us. The prayer room that is mentioned above is perfect for this.  Make sure your congregation is aware of this room and encourage them to use it.
By providing appropriate space, atmosphere and experience your facility can help provide ways for people to connect and be ministered to and thus encourage people to keep coming back on a regular basis and to invite others.

 

Attaining Distraction-Free Worship Sound

It’s been said many times but bears repeating: “Technology is best when it’s transparent.”

 

As I’m sure is the case with many of you, my life is quite hectic right now, packed beyond capacity with things to do.

Most of them are worthy things that I want and/or need to do, but they keep me hopping.

In response, I’ve chosen a very simple motto: “Simplify.” I plan to live by this simple (pun intended) maxim through the end of the year—at least. Simply (pun intended again), simplify means removing some of the clutter from my daily life and the complications that go with it.

When you’re a “type A” (driven) personality, as I am, there’s a strong tendency to not look before leaping—jumping with both feet into every project and activity without considering the consequences.

Even as mere humans, we can have tremendous capacity, but there’s a limit, a zone where there’s just too much noise, we feel too much stress, and we can’t be at our best in everything we do if there’s too much of everything to do.

In part, this new direction came about after a recent conversation with a friend about how noisy contemporary music is. Noisy as in busy. With all of the tools now available for music creation, recording, and amplification, sometimes it seems that they get used just because they can be used—without real purpose, resulting in compositions that are more noise than music.

The other day I was at a church that is looking to purchase a new digital mixing console. They’re moving away from the analog world.

But what struck me is the biggest factor to them in selecting a console is what plug-ins are offered internally or can run from an external server. Not once did they bring up sound quality, workflow, layout, I/O capability, operator friendliness, the ability to meet future expansion needs, and so on.

It got me thinking about what I see as a current philosophy of “we can fix it later”—just apply a plugin and all will be right with the world. Plop down a mic quickly and sloppily on stage or in the studio—no problem, we’ll just fix it with a plugin.

Even the more-humble live and recording systems have more tools than we can possibly need, just waiting to be applied nonetheless. But just because one can doesn’t mean one should. It’s adding up to a lot of noise.

A plugin can only do so much to “fix” a lousy mic signal—it’s still a lousy signal. So how about simplifying instead, taking the time to place the mic correctly in the first place in order to capture a quality signal?

I love technology. It can help us immensely in achieving our desired result, or even better. But there must be a point to using it. A voice must sound like a voice, a guitar like a guitar, a piano like a piano—once we achieve that, by applying simple time-proven concepts first, then we can take advantage of technology to tailor it.

One of my favorite photographers, Ansel Adams, did his work almost exclusively in black and white. The simplicity is one of the things that makes his work so powerful.

Late in his career, Adams used the latest darkroom equipment on his most popular work, Moonrise. Yes he took advantage of the best technology available—but he used it to enhance what was already there. He was not adding things, making it noisy; he was simply enhancing an already great image.

It’s been said many times but bears repeating: “Technology is best when it’s transparent.” Can I get an Amen?

Forget the Greeter!

Hopefully your greeters are doing more than just being an obstacle to get around.

Forget the greeter, give me an advocate

I don’t know about you, but when I visit someplace new I rarely go alone.  I usually take a guide (someone who has been to the place before) or a friend that I can share the uncomfortableness that I feel when visiting new places.

There is something about being with someone you know, experiencing something new.  I also think there is something even better that happens when someone who already knows the territory takes your around.

Now, in general churches do a good job of greeting people.  You know the couple standing at the door wearing a name tag and a glued-on smile. They are eager to shake your hand and say welcome.

I have had the question on my mind, “Why do we just have greeters and not advocates?”  An advocate is someone who is on your side. They are there to help you succeed.

So what is the difference between a greeter and an advocate?

A greeter says hi, an advocate steps in and helps.

When you walk in the door, a greeter does just what the name says, they greet you.  One of the large chain superstores has greeters at the door.  At least in my area the greeters are nothing more than an obstruction to walk around as you enter the store.

Hopefully your greeters are doing more than just being an obstacle to get around.  A good greeter will smile, be courteous and give a warm welcome.

At the same chain store I have never heard a greeter add on to the welcome statement, “how can I help you?” Right there with that question a greeter now becomes an advocate, a person that is there to help.

So have your greeters add the simple question “how can I help you?” right after the hello.  Also the greeter (now advocate) should introduce themselves. You want to know the name of the person that is advocating for you.

A greeter points, an advocate takes you there.

Another store in my town has really worked at stepping up their customer service. Recently, I asked where I could find a light bulb.  The employee smiled and said, follow me.  WOW she didn’t just point me in a direction but actually was taking me there.

On the walk there she asked what kind of bulb I was looking for, she even added that she had just switched to LED lights and was saving over $20 a month on her electric bill.  As we walked down the aisle with the light bulbs she took me right to the location of the type of bulb I was looking for.  I have to admit I was impressed.

When someone walks in the door at your church and asks where the children’s area is, I bet your greeter dutifully points them in the right direction.  Let’s get them to be an advocate and walk the visitors to the children’s area and on the way explain how the check in system works and let them know how much the teachers love kids.

A greeter smiles, an advocate engages you

A good greeter will actually give you an authentic smile and a warm hand shake.  An advocate will not only do that but they will also look you in the eye, introduce themselves, ask a little about you and then assist you with whatever you need.

A greeter makes you feel welcome; an advocate makes you feel at home.

A good greeter who is genuine will make you feel welcome.  An advocate is unequally positioned to make you feel comfortable and at home.  Often its little things, like them asking where you live only to find out that your neighbors are best friends with the advocate.

Perhaps its finding out your kids have the same teacher at school, or it could be a number of other things.  The important thing is that there was a connection made, some common ground, friends or experience.  That is exactly what makes people feel comfortable and at home.

Your assignment.
Go fire your greeters and rehire and retrain them as advocates.  Advocates of every person who walks thru the door at your church.  If you do this, I think you will be surprised at how quickly new people will feel cared for and want to keep coming back.

What Makes A Great Church Building?

In the pursuit of worthy facility, what elements must come together to create a sacred space?

There are some facets that go into what makes a church building great and they all intertwined together.

It’s really the collision of form and function in an explosive manner that brings greatness.

Form can be looked at and described in many ways.  I would prefer to call it design rather than form.  Design in our modern vocabulary congers up ideas like beauty, inspiration and engagement.

Good design actually also includes function.

If we look at the iPhone most people would give it compliments on its design.  They would say, its sleek, classy, beautiful and it works great.

Shouldn’t our church facilities be referred to in the same fashion?

In my home town is Hope College, on its campus sits Dimnent Chapel.

The beautiful Gothic structure was completed in 1929. The construction cost was $404,000 (about $5.6 million in 2016 dollars).

At the front of the 1150 seat chapel is the beautiful rose window, a gift from the Hope College Class of 1916 and constructed at a cost of $4,000, it contains three rows of petals.  When the sun shines thru this magnificent work of art it is absolutely breathtaking. The tall walls and beautiful wood work gives you a feeling of awe and wonder as you sit inside and gaze around the structure.

There are two organs in the chapel, a four-manual Skinner organ in the chancel and a Dutch classic tracker organ in the balcony, built by Pels and Van Leeuwen in the Netherlands and installed in 1971. The Skinner organ with its 2,932 pipes was installed in 1929. Both organs sound fabulous in the space.

Yearly the college does a Christmas Vespers service. The program of Christmas carols and anthems features more than 200 performers. The choir with minimal acoustic instrumentation along with the Skinner organ is a thing of sure beauty.

For me the Chapel as the locals call it is a great building.

It is engaging.

Just looking at it from the outside calls you to want to enter to see what the inside is like.  The soaring 108’ tower makes the approximately 175’ long by 60’ wide structure appears larger than life.  Once inside all of the elements I mentioned above, particularly the stained glass windows personally draw me through their beauty closer to my creator.

It is inspiring.

Just as it is engaging, drawing you in, its beauty inspires you.  The magnificence of the marble floors, the deep wood colors and colors splashed about by the sun penetrating the stained glass windows brings light and hope deep into my soul.

It’s functional.

Hosting events like a student lead chapel service that features modern music, an organ concert, a choral vespers service as well as bachelorette.  The building is well used and services multiple different types of events extremely well.  There have been modern elements and conveniences added to the building like Air conditioning, modern restrooms, a performance sound system along with production lighting and video screens.  But all of that has added to the function and comfort of the building without taking away from the beauty of its design.

Really what it boils down to is that the experience that you have attending an event there is enhanced as you walk up to the building and then as you participate in the event that takes place inside.

Today what are we doing in our worship spaces to bring design and beauty into the facility? Think of ways, like bringing in artwork or creatively using projection and lighting that you can use to bring beauty.