5 Ways to Instill A Call to Ownership in Your Church Facility

It really is great when people take ownership of your church, they take initiative and responsibility. They take notice and treat things better. After all isn’t that why we say, “treat it like your own” if you are using or borrowing something?

 

Who owns the church building? Maybe the better question is who paid for the church building?  A pastor that I used to work for always loved to hear people refer to the church as “my church”.  So rather than say “at Community church this is going on”, He liked to hear people say’ “at my church this is going on” For him it was affirming that people had taken ownership, it showed that a person closely identified with the church.

It really is great when people take ownership, they treat things better. After all isn’t that why we say, “treat it like your own” if you are using or borrowing something?

Ownership is great, but how can you foster it?

1.) Reminder Notes

In a classy way give people a call to action.

For example, you could put a nice looking table top in the bathroom that says, “As we all are the church, please help in keeping it clean.  After you have wiped your hands please use that same paper towel to wipe down the counter.”

You could put similar cards in the kitchen and coffee areas.  The key is to keep it a positive call to action.  Avoid the shaming, nagging signs like “your mother doesn’t work here, clean up after yourself”.

2.) Example

When I was in college I had a cool opportunity to be in a group that met with a billionaire in our town.

We were walking downtown taking a tour of some of his properties.  As we were walking, without missing a second of conversation, the billionaire bent down a picked up an empty cup sitting on the side walk.  He then carried that cup to the next stop at one of his properties and threw it in the trash.

The rest of that day –  all of us college students were picking up anything that was on the ground that even resembled trash.

He, the Billionaire – on many levels – set an example.

a) He was humble, not above the task of picking up garbage.

b) He showed he cared about what the city looked like.

c) He took ownership of keeping HIS city clean by picking up the cup and carrying it until he found a proper means of disposal..

People follow leaders.  What kind of example are you as a leader setting for your congregation?

3.) Proclamation

I am not a big fan of making a lot of announcements during a service, but occasionally it is good to give people a reminder of what, as a church, you think is important.

Again make sure you keep it positive and simple.

For example, “One of our core values is excellence unto the Lord, you can help us accomplish excellence in the presentation of our facility by making sure you pick up the cups and papers around you and dispose of them in the containers in the lobby. Doing this ensures that the next service can walk into a clean sanctuary just as you did this morning.”

4.) Stewardship

What we value we generally make happen.  If you value stewardship it would be good to remind people in your annual report about how we as a church must be a good steward of the facility that we have be given the privilege of caring for.  Following the reminder, it would be a great time to ask people to volunteer to clean the parking lot, care for the landscaping, paint or do anything that needs to be done to help beautify the facility.

5.) Call to action

Most pastors are good at putting a call to action at the end of their sermon. It would be wise to also occasionally include a call to ownership.

It might be a call for people to represent their church in a positive manner by living a God honoring life.  It might be a call to take ownership of the homeless problem in your city.  It could be a specific call like caring for the facility that we as the church are all responsible for.

Once people take ownership, they take responsibility.  Go and remind people who the church is and who the owners are.

Worship Leader vs. Tech Director

 
I have been in sound checks and rehearsals where the tension in the air was so tight that it was palpable.

 

Worship Leader Vs Tech Director.  Who leads who?

At a Leadership seminar I attended, Bill Hybels was talking about what he calls his 360 Leadership idea.

In a nutshell, you lead down, lateral, up and you lead yourself.  Hybels expanded on the lateral leadership part by talking about how, at many church seminars, big churches assume more self importance. They would come in and talk down to small churches, thus alienating them.  The relationship is a lateral one and should be treated that way, it is Pastor to Pastor, Leader to Leader.

The Sunday morning relationship between musician and tech can sometime get a little, shall we say, heated.

I have been in sound checks and rehearsals where the tension in the air was so tight that it was palpable.  When this happens, it is often the case where the worship leader has “taken control” and everybody must listen to him and follow him or else.

This dictatorship style leading can work well in crisis situations like fighting a fire or engaging in warfare combat, where there is no time or place for niceties or questions.

Sunday mornings should not be like this.

There is also the case where the sound tech is so rude and controlling that musicians will live with a terrible monitor mix, just because they are afraid the sound tech is going to fly off the handle and yell at them if they ask for a change.

Sunday mornings should not be like this.

What is needed is lateral leadership.

My interpretation of lateral leadership is where both the worship leader and the production team look to influence, help and serve each other.

For this to take place these 6 key things must be in place.

1) Respect.
If there is not respect between the worship leader and production team someone must leave or radical change needs to take place for this relationship to work.  I have been around too many ministries where there is the tech click and the musician click and they are both at constant odds with each other.  They talk behind each other back, complain among themselves about the “other guys” and keep walls up so communication is stifled.  For a team to function well and exhibit lateral leadership there has to be mutual respect.

2) Listen first.
Everybody has opinions and that is great, share your opinion, but as a rule not before the other person has shared their idea or opinion.  When we are extremely excited about something it is hard not to blurt it out.  It is also hard to really listen to the other person as you just want to spit out your idea.  You need to listen, really listen to the other person before you speak.  Really listening means that you are seeking to understand the person not just hear them

3) Extend trust/be vulnerable.
Give the other person the benefit out the doubt and be willing to share how you are feeling about things.  Until you decide to trust the other person and to be vulnerable, chances are they will also not be vulnerable or trusting of you.  Without trust there is no real relationship.

4) Create a safe space.

Be proactive about creating a space where opinions and ideas can openly be expressed.  Never put down a person. Never dismiss their idea in a way that makes them embarrassed for bringing it up or belittled by your response to it.  For the worship team and production team all ideas and opinions should be validated and encouraged.

5) Do not move on without consensus.
You might have to say something like, “George, I know you don’t necessarily agree with me on this, but can we move forward and can you do it with 100 percent effort? I know that it is not easy, and I appreciate you doing this for the sake of the team” Note, if the consensus required is always to get people to agree and jump in on your ideas, you are really operating under a dictatorship.

It may be guised as a collaborative group, but if you have conditioned everyone to be yes-men and women, or you are always convincing (manipulating) others to get your way, face it, you’re being a dictator.  Maybe a nice one and a crafty one, but still a dictator.

6) Understand Each other. 
Previously I have written articles on this.  “What Techs really want from a worship leader?” and What does a worship leader really want from a sound Tech.  I recommend that Techs and Musicians read both of them.  In Stephen Covey’s book on The 7 Habits, Habit 5 states, “Seek first to understand, then to be understood. Learn what “the other” guys really want or need, before you push yours.

Lateral leadership really boils down to serving, supporting and encouraging each other.

This article probably should have been titled “The service between a worship leader and a tech director” instead of “Worship Leader Vs Tech Director, who leads?”